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NOT FILM - the new doc on Samuel Beckett's FILM, a double feature!

Aug 30 to Sep 1
Tuesday to Thursday 3:30, 6:30pm

Dir. Ross Lippman - 2016 - 128m - No Matinees

In 1964 author Samuel Beckett set out on one of the strangest ventures in cinematic history:  his embattled collaboration with silent era genius Buster Keaton on the production of a short, titleless avant-garde film.  Beckett was nearing the peak of his fame, which would culminate in his receiving a Nobel Prize five years later.  Keaton, in his waning years, never lived to see Beckett’s canonization. The film they made along with director Alan Schneider, renegade publisher Barney Rosset, and Academy Award-winning cinematographer Boris Kaufman, has been the subject of praise, condemnation, and controversy for decades. Yet the eclectic participants are just one part of a story that stretches to the very birth of cinema, and spreads out to our understanding of human consciousness itself.

NOTFILM is the feature-length movie on FILM’s production and its philosophical implications, utilizing additional outtakes, never before heard audio recordings of the production meetings, and other rare archival elements.

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NOT FILM - the new doc on Samuel Beckett's FILM, a double feature! poster

Samuel Beckett's FILM - the legendary collaboration with Buster Keaton restored!

Aug 30 to Sep 1
Tuesday to Thursday 5:45, 8:45

Dir. Samuel Beckett - 1965 - 22m - No matinees so do the double feature!!

DOUBLE FEATURED WITH THE NEW DOCUMENTARY ON THIS LEGENDARY COLLABORATION NOTFILM

Samuel Beckett, the celebrated author of Waiting for Godot, made a single work for projected cinema. It’s in essence a chase film; the craziest ever committed to celluloid. It’s a chase between camera and pursued image that finds existential dread embedded in the very apparatus of the movies itself. The link to cinema’s essence is evident in the casting, as the chased object is none other than an aged Buster Keaton, who was understandably befuddled at Beckett and director Alan Schneider’s imperative that he keep his face hidden from the camera’s gaze. The archetypal levels resonate further in the exquisite cinematography of Academy Award-winner Boris Kaufman, whose brothers Dziga Vertov and Mikhail Kaufman created the legendary self-reflexive masterpiece Man With a Movie Camera. Commissioned and produced by Grove Press’s Barney Rosset, FILM is at once the product of a stunningly all-star assembly of talent, and a cinematic conundrum that asks more questions than it answers.

RESTORED BY: UCLA FILM & TELEVISION ARCHIVE, IN COOPERATION WITH THE BRITISH FILM INSTITUTE. PRESERVATION FUNDED THROUGH THE AVANT-GARDE MASTERS PROGRAM FUNDED BY THE FILM FOUNDATION AND ADMINISTERED BY THE NATIONAL FILM PRESERVATION FOUNDATION.  LABORATORY SERVICES BY CINETECH, ASCENT MEDIA, NT PICTURE AND SOUND, DOLBY LABORATORIES, AND AUDIO MECHANICS. SPECIAL THANKS TO: THE ACADEMY FILM ARCHIVE, EDWARD BECKETT, NICOLE BRENEZ, LES ÉDITIONS DE MINUIT, EVERGREEN REVIEW, DAVID GRAY, SHAWN JONES, JONATHAN LEE, IRÈNE LINDON, BRUCE MAZEN, THE PACIFIC FILM ARCHIVE, BARNEY AND ASTRID ROSSET.

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Samuel Beckett's FILM - the legendary collaboration with Buster Keaton restored! poster

Alibi Midnight Madness Presents

Antibirth poster

Antibirth

Sep 9 to Sep 10
Friday and Saturday 10:30pm ONLY!

Dir. 2016 - Danny Perez - 95m - An ALIBI MIDNIGHT MOVIE MADNESS presentation - $8 general / $6 students with i.d.s

Hard-drinking, pill-popping, bong-ripping Lou (Natasha Lyonne) and her best friend Sadie (Chloë Sevigny) spend their days adrift in a druggy haze. But one wild night out becomes a bad trip that never ends when Lou wakes up with symptoms of an unexplained, highly abnormal pregnancy. Who—or what—is growing inside her? As her due date approaches with alarming swiftness, the fear, paranoia, and conspiracy theories begin to pile up. Spiked with blasts of hallucinatory color, surreal shocks, and subversive comedy, the audacious feature debut from Danny Perez is a no-holds-barred descent into delirium.

“A relentless hyperchromatic trip from altered state start to Cronenbergian and Lynchian finish, Antibirth might be a good film, it's just difficult to coherently justify exactly why. Cult superstardom awaits.” - Andrew Marshall, Starburst

“Amazingly weird, astonishingly gross.” - Meredith Borders, Birth.Movies.Death.

“Highly crafted and unsettling.” - Kim Newman, Screen International

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