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Oscar Nominated Short Films - 2016 !!

Feb 5 to Feb 14
Friday to the following Sunday

It's that time of year again - Academy Award nominated shorts from around the planet:  LIVE ACTION, ANIMATION and DOCUMENTARY!  

Friday February 5 to Monday February 8 - ANIMATION! @ 4:15, 6:15, 8:15

Sanjay’s Super Team – dir. Sanjay Patel, USA, 7 minutes
World of Tomorrow – dir. Don Hertzfeldt, USA, 17 minutes
Bear Story – dir. Gabriel Osorio, Chile, 11 minutes
We Can’t Live Without Cosmos – dir. Konstantin Bronzit, Russia, 16 minutes
If I Was God (additional film)
Taking Flight (additional film)
The Short Story of a Fox and a Mouse (additional film)
The Loneliest Spotlight (additional film)
Catch It (additional film)
Prologue – dir. Richard Williams, UK, 6 minutes  **parental guidance suggested on this title!**

Tuesday February 9 to Thursday February 11 - DOCUMENTARY! @ 3:30, 7pm

PROGRAM A (Running time: 87 minutes)
Body Team 12 – dir. David Darg, Liberia, 13 minutes
A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness – dir. Sharmen Obaid-Chinoy, Pakistan, 40 minutes
Last Day of Freedom – dirs. Dee Hibbert-Jones & Nomi Talisman, USA, 32 minutes

10 MINUTE INTERMISSION
 

PROGRAM B (Running time: 76 minutes)
Chau, Beyond the Lines – dir. Courtney Marsh, USA/Vietnam, 34 minutes
Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah – dir. Adam Benzine, USA, 40 minutes

Friday February 12 to Sunday February 14 - LIVE ACTION! @ 3:30, 5:45, 8pm

Ave Maria – dir. Basil Khalil, Palestine/France/Germany, 15 minutes
Shok – dir. Jamie Donoughue, Kosovo/UK, 21 minutes
Everything Will Be OK – dir. Patrick Vollrath, Germany/Austria, 30 minutes
Stutterer – dir. Benjamin Cleary, UK/Ireland, 12 minutes
Day One – dir. Henry Hughes, USA, 25 minutes

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Oscar Nominated Short Films - 2016 !! poster

Paul Robeson Double Feature! In Honor of Black History Month!

Feb 6 to Feb 7
Saturday & Sunday starting at 1pm

1933 - 75m each approx - Only $7 for one or both so do the double feature!

TO BE SCREENED ON ACTUAL CELlULOID FILM!  

“Paul Robeson was the epitome of the 20th-century Renaissance man. He was an exceptional athlete, actor, singer, cultural scholar, author, and political activist. His talents made him a revered man of his time, yet his radical political beliefs all but erased him from popular history. Today, more than one hundred years after his birth, Robeson is just beginning to receive the credit he is due.” - PBS, American Masters Program

1pm  EMPEROR JONES - Of all Paul Robeson’s eleven starring film performances, by far his most iconic was his breakthrough in the big-screen adaptation of Eugene O’Neill’s The Emperor Jones (1933). He was already a legend for his stage incarnation of Brutus Jones, a Pullman porter who powers his way to the rule of a Caribbean island, but with this, his first sound-era film role, his regal image was married to his booming voice for eternity. With The Emperor Jones, Robeson became the first African-American leading man in mainstream movies and, he said, gained a deeper understanding of cinema’s potential to change racial misconceptions.  [Dir. Dudley Murphy & William C. de Mille - 1933 - 75m approx]

2:30pm SONG OF FREEDOM - Along with The Emperor Jones, Song of Freedom is arguably the best of Paul Robeson's starring features. Robeson plays London dockworker John Zinga, obsessed with the urge to return to his African "roots" (this was nearly 40 years before Alex Haley!) Discovered by an operatic impresario, John achieves singing stardom on the concert stage -- only to throw it all away to make a pilgrimage to Africa, there to assume leadership of his ancestral tribe, the Casangas. His efforts to free the natives of their superstitions and bring the advantages of civilization to the region are opposed by the local witch doctors, who do their best to kill John and his young wife (Elizabeth Welch). Zinga is saved when he suddenly and instinctively offers a rendition of the tribal "song of freedom," proving beyond all doubt that he is the rightful ruler of the Casangas.  [Dir. J. Elder Wallace, J. Elder Wills - 1937 - 70m]

Paul Robeson Double Feature!  In Honor of Black History Month! poster

Alibi Midnight Madness Presents

The Lost Boys - the original 1987 hit! poster

The Lost Boys - the original 1987 hit!

Feb 19 to Feb 20
Friday and Saturday 10:30pm

Dir. Joel Schumacher - 1987 - 97m - An ALIBI MIDNIGHT MOVIE MADNESS presentation! $8 general / $6 students with i.d.s

SPECIAL DOOR PRIZES COURTESY OF LOBO ANIME AND COMICS & BUBONICON 48!!

In this hit '80s hybrid of the horror movie and the teen flick, a single mom and her two sons become involved with a pack of vampires when they move into an offbeat Northern California town. Lucy (Dianne Wiest) and her sons, Michael (Jason Patric) and Sam (Corey Haim), move to Santa Carla to live with Lucy's lovable but curmudgeonly father (Barnard Hughes). Lucy gets a job from video-store owner Max (Edward Herrmann), then begins dating him, while Sam hangs out with Edward and Alan Frog (Corey Feldman and Jamison Newlander), a pair of vampire-obsessed comic-shop clerks. Soon Michael falls in with some actual vampires after becoming enamored of one of their victims: Star (Jami Gertz), a gypsy-like vixen who is trying to hold on to her humanity even though vampire leader David (Kiefer Sutherland) wants to play Peter Pan to her Wendy. When Michael visits the cavernous hangout of David and his cronies and unwittingly drinks from a wine bottle full of vampiric blood, he becomes an unwilling member of the bloodsucker biker gang. Soon, it's up to Sam and the Frog brothers to destroy David and his ilk without killing Michael and Star. Shot on location in the coastal California town of Santa Cruz and directed by Hollywood pro Joel Schumacher, The Lost Boys became a pop-culture phenomenon thanks to its attractive young stars, offbeat soundtrack, and hip, clever marketing campaign. The film's tagline -- "Sleep all day. Party all night. Never grow old. Never die. It's fun to be a vampire." -- perfectly captured its knowing mixture of attitude and gore. The effects team who transformed Sutherland and company into snarling bloodsuckers would go on to provide equally gruesome effects for Blade, another revisionist vampire flick, more than a decade later!

“Heady, cutting-edge vampire stuff. Mind you, it's also very tongue-in-cheek. So watch out for those fangs, gang.” - Roger Hurlburt, South Florida Sun-Sentinel

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